February 23, 2009

Nostalgia knocks


Since the invention of cameras, important events and milestones have called for two types of people in this world: those who look through the camera lens and snap away, and those who try to ingrain every sight, every motion into memory, preferring to live in the moment.
"I was having my childhood. But I was haunting it, as well, practically reading it, and preventing it. How much noticing could I permit myself without driving myself round the bend? Too much noticing and I was too self-conscious to live; I trapped and paralyzed myself, and dragged my friends down with me, so we couldn't meet each other's eyes, my own loud awareness damning us both. Too little noticing, though--I would risk much to avoid this--and I would miss the whole show. I would wake on my deathbed and say, What was that?"
--from An American Childhood
Regardless of which type of person you are, you are probably familiar with such moments -- moments when you are so itchingly happy, you already start aching, missing them before they have even ended. It's then that nostalgia's like the pesky guest who arrives 15 minutes before you told everyone to come, and 10 minutes before the potatoes are going to be ready.

3 comments:

Kara said...

I like this very much.

KitKat said...

"Regardless of which type of person you are, you are probably familiar with such moments -- moments when you are so itchingly happy, you already start aching, missing them before they have even ended."
^ summer 2008

:P well written, milly! <3

Christine said...

have you ever seen that quote from anne of green gables? the one about how something can almost be so beautiful that it makes you hurt (ok, lots more eloquent than that, I promise). If not, remind me to dig it up and send to you when I get a chance.

Miss ya. :(